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Initial results using a non-refractive shape-changing hydrogel corneal inlay to correct presbyopia

Poster Details

First Author: S.Bafna USA

Co Author(s):    W. Wiley                    

Abstract Details

Purpose:

To evaluate the effectiveness of monocular non-refractive hydrogel corneal inlay implantation to improve presbyopia within a centers�â�€�™ initial set of presbyopic patients.

Setting:

Private practice refractive clinic �â�€�“ Clear Choice Custom Laser Center, Brecksville, Ohio, U.S.A.

Methods:

A shape changing hydrogel corneal inlay (Raindrop, Revision Optics) was implanted in the nondominant eye of presbyopic emmetropes (�.25 D to �.75 D). Results from the clinic�â�€�™s first 16 patients are reported. The corneal inlay was placed under a flap in 12 eyes and within a pocket in 4 eyes, both created at a 30% corneal depth with a femtosecond laser (iFS, AMO). Uncorrected near visual acuity (UCNVA) and uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCDVA) in the inlay eye are reported at 1 month. Additional patients and longer-term follow-up up to 6 months will be presented. Acuities are reported in logMAR.

Results:

Mean UCNVA in the inlay eye at 1 month was 0.16, with 86% of eyes seeing 0.3 (20/40) or better and 57% seeing 0.1 (20/25) or better at near. Mean UCDVA in the inlay eye at 1 month was 0.2, with 80% seeing 0.3 (20/40) or better and 43% seeing 0.1 (20/25) or better at distance. No statistically difference was found in the results between eyes in which the inlay was placed under a flap versus within a pocket.

Conclusions:

Our results suggest that a non-refractive shape changing hydrogel corneal inlay implanted either within a pocket or under a flap provides good near and distance visual acuity for presbyopic emmetropic patients.

Financial Disclosure:

receives consulting fees, retainer, or contract payments from a company producing, developing or supplying the product or procedure presented, receives consulting fees, retainer, or contract payments from a competing company

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