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Accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking for progressive keratoconus: safety and efficacy

Poster Details

First Author: L.Papaioannou UK

Co Author(s):    D. Laverick   A. Konstantopoulos   D. Anderson   A. Turnbull   E. Karmiris   P. Hossain     

Abstract Details

Purpose:

To assess the safety and efficacy of the accelerated corneal collagen cross linking (CXL) protocol used in our department for the management of progressive keratoconus.

Setting:

Eye Unit, University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust

Methods:

The records of all the patients who underwent accelerated CXL (9 mW/cm2 for 10 min) for progressive keratoconus in our department during the period 2013-2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Exclusion criteria were insufficient data or lost follow-up, pregnancy, active anterior segment pathologic features and previous corneal or anterior segment surgery. Outcome measures included best corrected distance visual acuity (BCDVA), steep keratometry, flat keratometry, posterior elevation at the apex, thinnest pachymetry and complications. All the above parameters were evaluated at baseline preoperatively and postoperatively. All the topographic and pachymetric values were measured with rotating Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam High Resolution, Oculus).

Results:

Totally 125 eyes of 119 patients underwent CXL during the above period. All eyes received the same accelerated protocol and preliminary data analysis has shown that the procedure was effective in halting the progression of keratoconus and moreover resulted in flattening of the treated corneas documented as a decrease of the keratometric values. Only 1 out of 125 eyes developed postoperative infectious keratitis which resolved on topical antibiotics.

Conclusions:

The accelerated corneal collagen cross linking (9 mW/cm2 irradiation for 10 min) was effective and safe in halting the progression of keratoconus in our case series.

Financial Disclosure:

NONE

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