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Intracorneal rings (ICR) outcome in patients with Down and Asperger syndrome

Poster Details

First Author: M.Ortube SPAIN

Co Author(s):                        

Abstract Details

Purpose:

To describe the clinical outcome of ICR placement in 2 patients with keratoconus (KC) and developmental delay.

Setting:

Surgical cases in pr�Ã�­vate corneal surgery practice (Cl�Ã�­nica Oftalmol�Ã�³gica CIMO, Sevilla, SPAIN)

Methods:

KC is a bilateral, noninflammatory progressive corneal ectasia. Clinically, the cornea becomes progressively thin and conical, resulting in myopia, irregular astigmatism, and corneal scarring. The disease usually arises in childhood or the teenager years. We report two patients with the association of KC and Down syndrome/ Austim spectrum disorder. The patients with developmental delay and intolerance to spectacles or contact lenses underwent ICR placement. Five years follow-up visits included visual acuity measurement, retinoscopy, and corneal topography.

Results:

A 29 years-old female patient was referred with diagnosis of Down syndrome, mental retardation, cataract and KC. Her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in her left eye (LE) was counting fingers (CF). An ICR was placed. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) improved up to 0.1 and remains stable five years after surgery. A 12 years old male patient, with Asperger syndrome and bilateral KC consulted for low vision. His BCVA was 0.2 in his RE and CF in his LE. An ICR was placed in her RE. UCVA improved up to 0.8 and remains stable five years after surgery.

Conclusions:

KC onset can occur in early childhood, especially in patients with Down syndrome. ICR can be a good surgical choice for patients with KC and developmental delay. In this setting, ICR may be considered as a treatment option in those patients who are unable to wear contact lenses or spectacles due to high refractive errors or cognitive disorders.

Financial Disclosure:

NONE

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