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Safety and efficacy of primary intraocular lens implantation in children under 1 year

Poster Details

First Author: W.Astle CANADA

Co Author(s):    E. Sanders                    

Abstract Details

Purpose:

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intraocular lens as a primary option in treating children with cataracts under one year of age.

Setting:

Alberta Children�â�€�™s Hospital, Calgary Alberta Canada

Methods:

A retrospective case series was completed including all patients of one surgeon (WA), treated for primary cataracts under one year of age from 1994-2016. 74 eyes of 55 children with cataracts were included (36 unilateral, 19 bilateral). 20 eyes had primary cataract surgery elsewhere and left aphakic (25.7%), 8 of which, subsequently had a secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implanted at ACH. 54 primary cataract eyes had a primary IOL placed in-the-bag, including a primary posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitrectomy. Average age at surgery was 3.75 months (range=1.5-11.5months), and average follow-up was 6.39 years (range= 6 months -15 years).

Results:

61.54% of eyes achieved vision of 20/200 or better and 26.92% of eyes had final vision of 20/50 or better. 53.85% of aphakic eyes had vision 20/250 or worse, compared to IOL eyes at 33.3%. 44.59% of IOL eyes developed secondary membranes requiring secondary surgery. 52% of patients required strabismus surgery. 8.1% of eyes developed secondary glaucoma, 0% in the IOL eyes. 5/6 glaucoma eyes were aphakes, with the remaining eye having had congenital glaucoma prior to the cataract surgery. There were no other significant visual or structural complications noted in the cohort

Conclusions:

Final visions overall were better in the IOL group than those eyes left aphakic. There was no glaucoma in the eyes implanted with an IOL. Overall, primary intraocular lens implants in children under the age of 1 year are safe and effective long-term, and should be considered as a standard surgical treatment for successfully improving vision in this complex group of patients.

Financial Disclosure:

NONE

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