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Comparison of two laser fragmentation patterns used in femtosecond laser-assisted lens surgery

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Session Details

Session Title: Presented Poster Session: FLACS & Others

Venue: Poster Village: Pod 1

First Author: : M.Shajari GERMANY

Co Author(s): :    S. Khalil   W. Mayer   G. Al Khateeb   K. Petermann   E. Hemkeppler   T. Kohnen

Abstract Details

Purpose:

To evaluate the effect of fragmentation patterns (pie vs grid pattern) on effective phacoemulsification time (EPT).

Setting:

Department of Ophthalmology, Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany

Methods:

A total of 150 eyes which underwent femtosecond-laser assisted lens surgery were included in this retrospective analysis. 75 eyes were treated with the pie pattern. Their preoperative lens density was evaluated by Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam, Oculus). In a second step, eyes which were treated with the grid pattern were matched to the pie-pattern group based on the preoperative lens density. Main outcome measure was the effective phacoemulsification time.

Results:

Average patient age was 66 +/-10.67. Preoperative lens density was 10.05% +/-1.52. EPT was 6.64 +/-5.42 for pie pattern, significantly higher than 4.27 +/- 6.99 for grid pattern (P<0.01, Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test). Similarly, number of eyes with EPT=0 was significantly higher with grid pattern (37 for grid vs 1 for pie, P<0.01, Chi2-test). The regression analysis showed that EPT was significantly dependent on lens density for both methods (P=0.045 for pie vs. P<0.01 for grid). In eyes with lens density above 12% (9 eyes in each group), pie pattern showed significantly lower EPT (P=0.02, Wilcoxon rank-sum test).

Conclusions:

In cases of low to moderate lens density, grid fragmentation pattern should be used, as EPT is significantly lower and a significantly higher number of eyes did not require further emulsification. However, in eyes with high density (>12%), we recommend switching to pie pattern fragmentation.

Financial Disclosure:

NONE

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