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10 - 12 February 2017, MECC Maastricht,The Netherlands.

This Meeting has been awarded 15 CME credits.

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Computer-based tutorial as a supportive means to enhance quality and efficiency of the informed consent process for cataract surgery

Poster Details


First Author: M. Ullrich AUSTRIA

Co Author(s): N. Hirnschall   B. Doeller   K. Kefer   R. Varsits   J. Hienert   O. Findl     

Abstract Details

Purpose:

To assess whether informing patients with an interactive computer-based tool in addition to face-to-face discussion with their physician (a) reduces face-to-face discussion time, (b) increases the patient’s knowledge and (c) influences the patient’s attitude towards surgery.

Setting:

Vienna Institute for Research in Ocular Surgery, a Karl-Landsteiner-Institute, Hanusch Hospital, Vienna, Austria.

Methods:

Patients with bilateral cataract scheduled for cataract surgery were randomly allocated to the study group or control group. Patients in the study group were given an interactive computer-based tool (CatInfo) containing a detailed audiovisual presentation about cataracts and its treatment. All patients had a face-to-face informed-consent discussion with a physician. Duration of the informed-consent discussion was measured. Afterwards, patients in both groups received the same validated questionnaire with cataract-related questions as well as questionnaires assessing the decisional conflict. Patients were interviewed via telephone one month post-operatively to reflect on their decision (decision regret scale).

Results:

Preliminary results based on 86 patients (40 study group, 46 control group) were analysed. The mean age was 69 (51-91) and 71 (52-93) years respectively. The duration of the face-to-face informed consent discussion was significantly shorter in the study group, 1 minute 58 seconds (IQR 64–163 sec) versus 2 minutes 23 seconds (104–274 sec; p=0.013). Patients in the study group answered significantly more questions correctly (score 16.5 versus 15.6 out of 19, p=0.014). A trend towards higher decisional confidence in the study group was found (p=0.082). Detailed final results including 50 additional patients will be presented.

Conclusions:

Duration of the face-to-face consent process was significantly shorter in the study group and patients were better informed. Furthermore, there was a trend towards increased decisional confidence in the study group. These findings show that the interactive computer-based CatInfo tool is useful to improve the informed consent process.

Financial Disclosure:

None

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