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Evaluation of postoperative short-term therapy of topical bevacizumab in recurrent pterygium surgery

Poster Details

First Author: W.Nada EGYPT

Co Author(s):    M. Wagieh   M. Al Aswad           

Abstract Details



Purpose:

As corneal vascularization is considered a triggering factor for pterygium recurrence, to gain good patients tolerance and to avoid corneal side effects, the study aimed at evaluation of postoperative short term therapy for 2 weeks of topical bevacizumab in recurrent pterygium surgery

Setting:

Zagazig university Hospital , Egypt

Methods:

The study was a prospective comparative one including 40 eyes with recurrent pterygium , all eyes were subjected to pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft , postoperative topical tobramycine and dexamethazone . Among the 40 eyes 20 eyes (group 1)were subjected to addition of postoperative topical bevacizumab 5mg/ml 4 times daily for 2weeks . The remaining 20 eyes were (group 2). Follow up cases for 6 months recording corneal vascularization and recurrence.

Results:

The study showed good patients tolerance to topical bevacizumab . Group 1 of topical bevacizumab recorded after 6 months one case recurrence (5%) comparing to group 2 which recorded three cases (15%). Corneal vascularization was less in group 1than group 2.

Conclusions:

Postoperative short term therapy of topical bevacizumab carries the safety for the cornea , the good tolerance of patients and minimizing corneal vascularization and hence recurrence in recurrent pterygium surgery. FINANCIAL INTEREST: NONE

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