Copenhagen 2016 Registration Programme Exhibitor Information Virtual Exhibition Satellite Meetings Glaucoma Day 2016 Hotel Star Alliance
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10 - 14 Sept. 2016, Bella Center, Copenhagen, Denmark

This Meeting has been awarded 27 CME credits

 

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Posters

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Detection of non-metallic intraocular foreign bodies by using a super-wide-angle fundus camera

Poster Details

First Author: Y. Nakai JAPAN

Co Author(s):                        

Abstract Details

Purpose:

Fundus examination of an injured collapsed eye with a perforated sclera and prolapsed vitreous is a visibly challenging case. A super-wide angle fundus camera (Optos 200 TxTM) can be used to detect non-metallic vitreous foreign bodies in a collapsed eye. We present two cases that show the usefulness of a fundus camera in detecting vitreous objects.

Setting:

Case 1 is of a 29-year-old man who visited our hospital after his left eye was injured while working at a gas station. Case 2 is of a 42-year-old man who visited our hospital after his left eye was injured when he was hit by tree.

Methods:

In Case 1, visual acuity at the initial visit was 20/30 (n.c.). The vitreous body prolapsed from a small scleral wound measuring approximately 2 mm. No foreign body was detected on CT scan. An examination using a super-wide-angle fundus camera revealed 3 eyelashes in the vitreous cavity. In Case 2, visual acuity at the initial visit was 20/40 (20/25×-1.5 D). The vitreous body prolapsed from a scleral wound measuring approximately 2.5 mm. No foreign body was detected on CT. An examination using a super-wide-angle fundus camera revealed fragments of bamboo leaf in the vitreous cavity.

Results:

In Case 1, On the day of the initial visit, the vitreous body was operated to remove the 3 eyelashes. In Case2, On the day of the initial visit, the vitreous body was operated to remove the foreign bodies. In both cases, neither infection nor retinal detachment occurred after the operation, and the postoperative courses have been favorable. The current visual acuity is favorable at 20/20 (n.c.) in Case 1 and 20/30 (20/20×-2.0 D) in Case 2.

Conclusions:

In both cases the intra-ocular foreign body was detected with a super-wide angle fundus camera. Both images show scleral perforation and vitreous prolapse. Even when a CT scan or X-ray reveals no foreign body, there may be an eye lash, leaf, or other foreign body within the eye. Super-wide angle fundus camera is indispensable because it overcomes the problem of a vitreous prolapse hindering sufficient observation of the area around the fundus.

Financial Disclosure:

NONE

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